Excerpts from the Supreme Court of India, Oct. 24, 1994 regarding the destruction of the Babri Mosque in the town of Ayodhya
"As 1993 began, communal violence returned to India, sparked by the Controversy over a 16th centrury mosque said to stand on the ruins of an ancient Hindu temple honouring Lord Rama" It may be said that fundamentalism and pluralism pose the two challenges that people of all religious traditions face .....

A neutral perception of the requirement for communal harmony is to be found in the Baha'i Faith.

In a booklet, "Communal Harmony - India's Greatest Challenge" it is stated: "lasting harmony between heterogeneous communities can only come through a recognition of the oneness of mankind, a realisation that differences that divide us along ethnic and religious lines have no foundation. Just as there are no boundaries drawn on the earth of seperate nations, distingtions of social, economic, ethnic and religious identity imposed by peoples are artificial; they have only benefited those with vested interests. On the other hand, naturally occuring diverse regions on the planet, or the country, such as mountains and plains, each have unique benefits. The diversity created by God has infinite value, while distinctions imposed by man have no substance."

We conclude with the fervent hope that communal harmony, peace and tranquillity would soon decend in the land of Mahatma Gandhi, Father of the Nation, whose favourite bhajan was,

"Ishwar and Allah are both your names, Oh God! Grant this wisdom to all."

-Justice J. S. Verma
-Justice G. N. Ray